When you build a new home, be sure to build for the future. What do we mean by this? It all depends on what stage of life you’re in when you build the home. Different ages and stages have very different needs, but a good custom home that’s built for the future can offer you a lifetime of comfort and memories. 

Young Families

For families with young children, the ability to know that kids have a safe and protected place to play, grow and learn is so important. Homes need to be built with enough flexibility to allow for storing all those necessary pieces of equipment (strollers, portable cribs, swings, toy boxes, etc) plus the space for play on bigger toys or around a train table. 

The Teenage Years 

When you build for the future, the spaces you built for your young children can transition nicely into a game room and study area for your teens. Closets that previously held strollers and portable cribs can now house gaming consoles, wireless routers, or any other electronics that need to be kept out of view.  Or, larger closets can be converted into small concession areas in the event a playroom is converted into a small in-home theater. 

Empty Nest

Now that the kids are off to college or married with kids of their own, you might want to transform their old playroom into one of your very own. Did you always want your own in-home gym? How about a nice big space for entertaining, complete with billiards and a kegerator? Or maybe it’s time to convert that big closet into a humidity controlled place to store your fine wine.

Or perhaps it’s back to the train tables and toys that your grandchildren are going to enjoy when they visit. 

Aging in Place 

To build for the future, also consider your desire to age in place. Making your home easy to live in as you age will be a big help to you. It will also help ease your kids minds as well. When they know that you have zero entry showers, handrails and other things to help you stay safely in your home, they will feel at ease.   

A good custom home builder can sit down with you, think through the stages of your life and offer way to create living spaces that expand and contract when you need. If you have questions about custom homes or want to discuss building for your future, let us know. We are always eager to share our good ideas with you. 

Choosing a general contractor to bring your building project to fruition is a very important decision. Though there’s no foolproof way to maneuver through the selection process, you can improve your chances of success by asking these five key questions before hiring a general contractor for your building project.

1. DOES THE CONTRACTOR HAVE PROOF OF LICENSE AND INSURANCE?
Be sure to obtain proof of license and insurance from your contractor—no matter the size of the project.
Contractors who are unlicensed or uninsured put you and your property at significant financial risk. Double check that the licensed name matches the name on the contract and that the contractor’s license number is also listed on the contract. The insurance they carry should also be adequate for the size and risk of your project.

2. IS THE GENERAL CONTRACTOR LOCAL?
Local Contractor – With their years of experience, a local contractor knows the best solutions that can withstand certain problems that usually occur in your community. Compared to out-of-area contractors, local contractors also know the requirements of your municipality or state, so you can expect that they can do their job properly.

3. WHAT IS THE CONTRACTOR’S “CONTRACT DELIVERY METHOD?”
Understanding this fundamental question is crucial to choosing the right general contractor.
The three most prevalent construction contract delivery methods are 1) lump sum or fixed price 2) cost plus and 3) guaranteed max price (GMAX). Make sure you clarify which delivery method your contractor will be using.

WHAT DOES THE CONTRACTOR SEE AS THE MOST SIGNIFICANT CHALLENGES WITH THE PROJECT?
Occasionally, you should throw in a question that will give you valuable information about your project. Asking your contractor about potential challenges will not only reveal how much knowledge they have of the project but will also inform you of potential project hurdles.

Also, find out how the contractor mitigates changes that may impact the project’s cost and schedule during the build. Changes come in a variety of forms; they can be owner changes, unknown or discoverable issues, or drawing errors or omissions. Either way, there should be a clear plan to address each of these challenges.

5. WHAT IS THE CONTRACTOR’S SCHEDULE?
Spend some time discussing how the contractor prepares, follows, and updates the schedule. A mismanaged plan can cost time and a ton of money. Make sure the contractor’s project superintendent develops, monitors, and updates the schedule with assistance and input from the project manager on a regular basis.